[Azure] Using Azure Functions Proxies

If you’ve started using Functions in Azure and you’ve got multiple set-up by now, you’ll start to find that managing them becomes a bit cumbersome, especially when you’ve spread them across multiple instances. All of the instances will have a different base URL and you might find it difficult to keep naming and versioning in line with what you planned. So now what? Let’s take a look at the newly released Proxies for Azure Functions! Read More

[Azure] Using precompiled DLL’s for your Functions

One of the cool things about Azure Functions is that they are very easy to get started. You create a new function, type some code and you’re off. This is very nice from a getting started point of view, but once you’re considering to use them for more than just playing around, other things come into play. For instance, you might want to actually test what you’re doing. You might want to reference projects, you might want to reuse some of the code you (or your company) already has. Now there’s all kinds of ways of doing this, but just recently the Function teams introduced another very interesting possibility: the use of precompiled DLL’s. Read More

[Azure] Debugging Azure Functions: could not register URL

It’s still in the works, but the Azure Functions team released a preview version of the “Visual Studio Tools for Azure Functions”. At this time, you’ll need VS2015 Update 3 installed to get this to work, check out https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/webdev/2016/12/01/visual-studio-tools-for-azure-functions/ for further instructions.

So all excited I downloaded the tools, installed them and created my first local Function to debug from Studio. Unfortunately, it didn’t work. I got two command prompt windows which disappeared after a short while. No error, no debug, nothing. Hmmm….

A good next step is to run the functions CLI locally. You’ll need to have the CLI installed for this. Simply head over to the folder where you’ve just created your project and run “func host start”. In my case, this resulted in the following error:

“HTTP could not register URL http://+:7071/. Your process does not have access rights to this namespace”

You can assume that Visual Studio is facing the same issue, as it is also using the CLI underwater to host the functions. So what now? I found that the following command will list all of the registered http services:

Check that http.txt file and you’ll see there probably is an entry for http://+:7071/ in there.  I had nothing running on that port as far as I was aware so I decided to simply delete the reservation:

And there you go, the port is now freed up and both the CLI as well as debugging from Visual Studio (not at the same time, obviously) started working! 🙂

[Azure] Using an Azure Function to create custom Flow actions

If you’re working with Microsoft Flow, chances are that on some point in time you’ll run into a situation where the action you need simply doesn’t exist. If you’re a developer with skills to write C#, PowerShell, Node or even batch code, you’re in luck! Cause why not create that action yourself in the form of an Azure Function? Here’s how to do it.  Read More

[IoT] Limiting per device messaging & auto reset

This entry is part 9 of 9 in the series Azure Aquarium Monitor

In my aquarium monitor series I showed how to build an application to monitor a fish tank. The use of the Azure IoT components allow us to easily build these kinds of solutions based on generic components. It also allows us to scale, which makes it very suitable for scenarios with lots of devices or data.

Should you want to make your application multi-tenant, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t… or is there? What if you don’t have complete control over the clients and someone starts to send way more data then expected? Hmm…  Read More

[Azure] Custom Function bindings + notification tags in Cordova apps

Previously I explained how I am using an Azure Notification Hub to send out notifications to a mobile application made with Cordova (read it here). This is cool, but in that scenario every notification was being sent out to every client. This is fine for some situations but in most cases you probably want some mechanism to send out notification to specific devices or a group of people. The most used example is news: you subscribe to a couple of subjects and receive only notifications for messages linked to one of those subjects. This post details how you can achieve this.  Read More